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Live, Work, and Retire in Uruguay

Enjoying Life to the Fullest

What to Buy in Uruguay

The purpose of this page is to introduce the subject of things you can buy in Uruguay, or that you might hope are available here in Uruguay.  In the last year, many new and useful items have become available.  If I had known what they have here, (there is a ton of stuff) I would not have bothered to spend the money to ship so much!

This is the introduction page.  There will be posts that will be about this page as I add new items that can be purchased here.  The posts will link to this page when there is something new to see.

The Number 1 Complaint I hear since I arrived is how cheaply made, and how easy to break, most of the things you can buy in Uruguay are.

You have to balance that complaint with the fact that everything is 240 volts.  So if you make one mistake and plug something 110 into a 240 outlet, the item sizzles and you lose it.  I have lost three important items that way.  But I didn’t just plug them in.  I trusted the converter I had purchased to do its job.  Unfortunately, even though it was the size built to handle what I was using, it didn’t work properly and the item smoked even as I stood there.  Very sad!  I’ve actually lost nearly $2000 in electrical stuff from the converters not working.  There is no guarantee the little wall plugin type converters are going to work.

Now that I have purchased larger and more efficient converters, I have not had that problem.  But they are not cheap.  Since then, I bought an Oster blender — works super well. I bought a Phillips hand blender — works like a charm.

We purchased a washer and dryer, a Whirlpool refrigerator, sofa, chairs, vacuum cleaner — all things that are working nicely.  So I have some photos to put in here so you can see some of the things available in the small home appliance division and some tools!

I plan to take photos of other tools because I use them and brought a bunch with me.  It’s a royal pain because I have to use a converter to charge them.  Anyway, as you can see there are some brand names — in printers we have Canon, HP, Brother, and Epson plus some other brands.  In tools we have DeWalt, Stanley, and SkillSaw table saws and more.

Unless you’re a builder or woodworker, or unless you plan to be doing a lot of building on your own, a Stanley is a Stanley is a Stanley.  Same goes for Oster or Phillips brands.  There are lots of others that I am finding to do the job well in household items like the blender.  There is a brand called Punktal and it has some nice products.

You have to consider if it’s worth paying for it here, or paying for it in the country you’re coming from and then paying some more for shipping, and then some more for customs, and then, additionally if it’s electric, paying for converters.

Some of the items are the same price as in the states, a little less or a little more.  The difference is not that great — I just bought a bunch of stuff since coming here, and they are about the same or a little less than what they were in the Great Lakes region of the United States.  Things at my house in the states broke down on a somewhat regular basis too if they were used a lot.

I’ll be posting more items for your reading enjoyment and information on things you can buy in Uruguay and give you the questions you need to ask yourself to decide if you want to bring it with you or purchase it here.

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